MCAT Chemistry Question — Titrant | Next Step Test Prep MCAT Chemistry Question — Titrant | Next Step Test Prep

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The endpoint of a titration can be calculated requires that which of the following factors are known:

 

I. The moles of titrant added to solution

II. The molarity of titrant added to solution

III. The temperature of the titrant

 

A) I only

B) II only

C) I and II only

D) I, II, and III

 

Explanation

 

The endpoint of a titration is an approximation of the equivalence point, and is usually indicated by a color change by the indicator. The equivalence point in a titration is when the moles of titrant added are equal to the moles of analyte in the beaker. Thus the only thing needed is (A). Often, the moles of titrant added is calculated using the volume and concentration.

 

II: While the molarity of titrant can be used to find the moles, it is not the molarity itself that matters, but rather the moles used.

III: Temperature is irrelevant in a titration.

 

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