Your Law School Application Timeline

Successfully applying to law school is no easy feat. While the road to law school may be challenging or confusing at times, preparing a checklist and timeline will help to keep you on the right track throughout your entire law school application process. Here are some of the important things that you will want to keep in mind throughout the process. Give ample time for research and preparation. The first step is to thoroughly research various law schools. In your research, identify the pros and cons of each school and the things that match your needs and interests. The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) is a good place to start. After that, you can scour schools’ websites for information about their course offerings and specialties. Set your Law School Admission Test (LSAT) date. Decide when you are going to take the LSAT as soon as possible. February or June the year prior to your application is suggested, but you’ll want to make sure that you’re ready. The sooner you set your date, the sooner you can begin studying. Study efficiently. LSAT scores are crucial to your admission to law school. There are many ways to get ready for the LSAT. It’s critical that you give yourself at least three months to study, rigorously. You may also consider options such as hiring a tutor, enrolling in a prep course, or taking practice tests. InGenius Prep has a great network of test prep partners that we can refer you to based on your learning style and preferences, if you need any assistance. Create an LSAC account and register for the LSAT....

Worried About Your LSAT? Here’s What You Need To Do Next

  Recently Next Step Test Prep teamed up with InGenius prep to conduct a webinar about how to proceed once you get your LSAT scores back. The session covered: – Steps to take to balance out a lower than expected LSAT score – How to think about multiple scores on your record – Best study strategies for students who are re-taking the test If you missed the event, there is nothing to worry about, you can view a recording...

The Latest Trend in Law School Applications

After a downward spiral in the number of applications for the past few years, the number of high-scoring LSAT takers–specifically those with scores over 170–are back on the rise. What does this mean and what are its implications? The Implications of The Growing Law School Application Pool Aspiring law students and future lawyers are recognizing that it’s not a bad time to apply to law school. In spite of the many challenges that law firms are currently facing – relentless budget pressures, increasing workloads for associates, a growing number of complex cases, and demands for more rigorous internal controls and accountability – students are optimistic that a quality legal education from the right school can get them where they want to be. The students who truly know they want to go to law school, and aren’t just applying to hide from a weak job market like they did in 2008 and 2009, are more focused and determined than ever. As more students with higher LSAT scores are applying, soft factors will be given more weight in the application process to distinguish the many high-scoring applicants. This is where our former admissions officers can really help you in developing your application persona to stand out from the rest of the high-scoring pack or to try to fight the uphill battle of applying with a lower test score. Hard Factors vs. Soft Factors Hard factors are the aspects in the law school application that are given heavy emphasis by the admissions committee, such as the LSAT score and GPA. All other factors that might influence a law school’s admission decision are...

How Many Law Schools Should I Apply To?

Deciding how many law schools to which to apply can be quite tricky. Because of the competitiveness of law school admissions, students must be ready to apply to several law schools to increase their chances of getting into at least one program. So, How Many? Determining the number of law schools you should apply to depends on several factors, including the competitiveness of the schools you are applying to, your LSAT score and GPA, the college you attended, and your resume. If you have a very competitive GPA or LSAT score – above a 3.8 and above a 170 – and are applying to top-ranked law schools, you should apply to 8-10 schools. However, make sure that one of these schools is in your safety zone, meaning that you are above the school’s 25th percentile in terms of LSAT score. As you will be competing against thousands of qualified candidates, it’s important to always have a fallback option. If you have a lower GPA and LSAT, apply to more schools to increase your chances of getting admitted. Students who are committed to going to law school, regardless of what school or what rank the school is, should apply to 8-12 schools. Be realistic, as well. We all want to get into a top-ranked law school, but it’s important that you are applying to schools that are the right fit. To figure out what schools are a good fit based on your academic prowess, career goals, and personality, talk to a law school admissions expert. Getting into T14 Law Schools A stellar LSAT score and GPA, comprehensive resume, an impressive...

LSAT Study Schedule

An important factor in performing well on the LSAT is to carefully create a study schedule that works for you and stick to it. Ideally, you will start to prepare for the LSAT at least 8-12 weeks in advance. However, you can design an LSAT study plan that fits into your timeframe. As you review the following tips, remember that this is just a general guideline. The schedule you design must be realistic and work for you taking into consideration your study habits and time commitments. Create a schedule for each week and each day of the week for the length of your study regimen. Use test prep books as a guide to mapping out a detailed study schedule. The first week of preparation should involve familiarizing yourself with the LSAT exam and its question types. Explore the Law School Admissions Council’s website:   LSAC.org. It contains a lot of critical information about preparing for and taking the LSAT. Register for the LSAT. The earlier you register, the more likely you will get your preferred test location. Take a diagnostic LSAT exam. They are available at LSAC.org. Taking a timed, diagnostic test will give you a starting point as to where your strengths and weaknesses are, and give you an idea as to the realities of taking the LSAT. Review the portion of your LSAT prep materials that discusses strategies for preparation and test taking. For the next several weeks leading up to the week before the test date, design a schedule that allows you to methodically work through the 3 different types of questions. Using the organization of your...

How to Get Great Letters of Recommendation

A Guest post by by Peg Cheng of Prelaw-Guru.com. Along with a stellar personal statement and resume, great letters of recommendation (LORs) can help tip the scales in your favor when your law school application is “on the bubble”–not quite in but also not quite out. Never underestimate the power of a great recommendation. WHO SHOULD YOU ASK FOR LORS? If you are a current student, focus on securing all your LORs from professors and teaching assistants (TAs). If you graduated college two or more years ago,and are no longer in touch with your professors and TAs, ask for LORs from your supervisors and/or professional mentors. HOW MANY LORS SHOULD YOU GET? Most schools require two LORs but I recommend getting three. First, it is possible one of your recommenders may not follow through. Second, you may need that third LOR for some schools. Third, for schools that place you on the wait list, you might be able to send the last LOR as further evidence that you are a great candidate. WHEN TO ASK FOR LORS? Fall always seems so busy for everyone–whether you’re working or in school. Plan ahead. Ask for those LORs during June, July and August. If summer has passed and you’re applying this fall and still haven’t asked for LORs, then set up times to meet with your recommenders now. You haven’t a minute to lose! HOW TO ASK FOR LORS? I recommend meeting with each potential recommender in person to ask if he or she would be willing to write you a good LOR. This person is going to spend two to four hours writing a letter for you. That’s a lot of time!...

5 Simple Ways to Raise Your LSAT Reading Comprehension Score

The LSAT reading comprehension section tends to generate a lot of questions from our students. We’ll often hear, “How can I raise my LSAT reading comprehension score?” and “What are some LSAT reading comprehension strategies I can use to improve my score?” Our tutors swear by the simple ways listed below – they’re great reminders to keep in the back of your mind during your test practice!   1) Don’t Do the Questions In Order When the LSAC lays out the order of the questions in the Reading Comprehension, you can absolutely bet that they do not think, “let’s put the questions in the most logical order for someone taking the test!” Rather, they arrange the questions to make it more difficult. The habit of doing questions in order has been a part of your test-taking behavior since you began taking tests, and losing this habit takes discipline and confidence. But certain types of questions – especially questions about specific details in the passage – help you answer others – like ones that ask about the author or main idea.   2) Learn Your Strengths There is no formula for improving the LSAT score of every single test-taker, because every test-taker has different strengths and weaknesses. So learn what yours are! After you finish a section, take the time to review what types of questions you often get wrong, and try to spot a pattern. Once you have found such a pattern, then analyze each of the questions: what were you asked, what was correct, and why did you choose as you did? Continue to do this, and you...

5 Basic Tips for Logic Games

1.Paint a Picture Given infinite time, everyone can get every question of the logic games correct. But in only 35 minutes, you need to have access to the information and conditions of the game as quickly and intuitively as possible. The way to do this is through a diagram. A diagram takes into account all of the pieces of the game (something like FGHJK), and the space of the game. You’ll need to make a few copies of the diagram in each game, so keep your setup simple and quick (dashes are very easy to draw; grids are not). An ideal diagram is a complete diagram; when it is complete, you should not need to consult the rules and conditions of the game again.   2.Draw the Rules After you’ve set up the characters and space of the game, you need to draw the rules. You’ll want to practice symbolizing the rules in a clear and unambiguous; for example, if the order is fixed (G comes after A) write AG and draw a square around it. If the order is loose (G is adjacent to A), write AG and draw a circle. Rules that indicate fixed positions (“F is first”) place in the first space. Rules that indicate negative positions (“F does not go first”), place under the first space with a crossed out F. There are many systems for explaining the rules in symbols – once you find one that is comfortable and intuitive for you, stick with it and practice using it as much as possible.   3.Solve the Game Spend a minute or two on the...