Your Law School Application Timeline

Successfully applying to law school is no easy feat. While the road to law school may be challenging or confusing at times, preparing a checklist and timeline will help to keep you on the right track throughout your entire law school application process. Here are some of the important things that you will want to keep in mind throughout the process. Give ample time for research and preparation. The first step is to thoroughly research various law schools. In your research, identify the pros and cons of each school and the things that match your needs and interests. The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) is a good place to start. After that, you can scour schools’ websites for information about their course offerings and specialties. Set your Law School Admission Test (LSAT) date. Decide when you are going to take the LSAT as soon as possible. February or June the year prior to your application is suggested, but you’ll want to make sure that you’re ready. The sooner you set your date, the sooner you can begin studying. Study efficiently. LSAT scores are crucial to your admission to law school. There are many ways to get ready for the LSAT. It’s critical that you give yourself at least three months to study, rigorously. You may also consider options such as hiring a tutor, enrolling in a prep course, or taking practice tests. InGenius Prep has a great network of test prep partners that we can refer you to based on your learning style and preferences, if you need any assistance. Create an LSAC account and register for the LSAT....

Beating the LSAT: How Successful Students Prepare

John Rood, President and Founder of Next Step Test Preparation recently conducted a webinar on beating the LSAT.  Besides founding Next Step John has worked with hundreds of students over more than five years.  Watch this four part series to learn: How the LSAT fits into the law school admissions process. What skills are needed to succeed on test day. How the law school admissions process works and what matters most. How to approach questions on test day by working through sample problems. Next Step Test Preparation provides complete courses of one-on-one LSAT tutoring for about the price of a crowded lecture-style prep course. Email us or call 888-530-NEXT (6398) for a complimentary...

Should I Cancel My LSAT Score?

Today’s post comes from Ann Levine, president and chief consultant at Law School Expert. Ann is the former director of law school admissions at two ABA-approved law schools and the nation’s leading law school admission consultant. Law School Expert offers hourly and beginning-to-end consulting, and Ann has personally guided over 2,000 law school applicants through the law school admission process. Ann is also the author of the bestselling law school admission guidebook The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert. You have 6 days to cancel your LSAT score, and there is no advantage to canceling on the first day. Take your time, sleep on it, and see how you feel when the exhaustion has passed. And, when you wake up, here are some things to try to consider objectively before canceling your LSAT score: Was this your first time taking the LSAT? It’s a bit safer to cancel a score when you still have two more opportunities in front of you. If this was your third time taking the test in 2 years, you have to be pretty sure the results aren’t going to be better than your previous scores in order to risk throwing away your last opportunity for a better score. Was this your second time taking the LSAT? If so, you need to make a strategic decision about whether you can be ready in December. That will be your last chance for this admission cycle. And if you aren’t ready in December, or decide not to take the test for some other reason, you may decide to postpone your application cycle in order to maximize your chances of improving...

LSAT Explanations — Free PDF

See below for free explanations to LSAT PrepTest 61 Until now, it has been difficult for students to get high-quality explanations to a lot of LSAT questions. The LSAC’s SuperPrep book has complete explanations, but to only 3 tests (and those tests are very old). Students who take  prep courses have gotten these materials for years, but prep companies have wisely kept their most helpful material for their $1,000+ prep courses rather than their $15 off-the-shelf books. Next Step Test Preparation has released complete explanations for 10 of the most recent LSAT Preptests (52-61). These are the tests contained in LSAC’s 10 New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests” book. (You’ll need that book to get any value out of our explanations — but you should have that book anyway as it’s the cheapest source of recent exams). However, some students will get dramatically better score increases from explanations than others. Here are the right and wrong ways to use LSAT explanations: Wrong way: read a LSAT question, then read the explanation, then read the next question, etc. This approach assures that you don’t actually attempt the questions and are probably not internalizing either the patterns on the exam nor your own strengths and weaknesses. Right way: Take a full, timed practice test. (You should be doing this at least 1-2 times per weeks). Then, after you’ve completed the full test, correct it. Look at every question you missed and figure out why you missed it. Then, and only then, look at the explanation. The right way assures that you’re making your best effort to get everything right, then applying what you know on questions you missed, then,...

LSAT Webinar Transcript

In May 2012 we conducted a free webinar for students interested in learning about the LSAT and the law school admissions process. The transcript follows for you speed-readers; the video can be found here: http://nextsteptestprep.com2012/05/16/lsat-webinar-part/ Enjoy! Okay everybody, good evening!  Thanks for coming.  We got a good crowd tonight and probably more people will trickle in.  I am John Rood.  I am the President and Founder of Next Step Test Preparation.  What we are going to do here today is talk about the LSAT for the next hour.  Hopefully, everyone’s here for that.  What we did when we put this talk together was think a little bit about if you were just starting out or maybe having studying for the LSAT for a couple of weeks or maybe a month, what could we do that would be really beneficial to you?  So, what we thought about was in our tutoring business what are the five or six biggest questions that our students had and so that’s what we are going to try to address today. If you look at the bottom of this slide, we are going to do a Q&A at the end and actually may intersperse a couple as we go.  So, if you have a question, please e-mail that question to me at [email protected] with the subject line LSAT Webinar or something like that so we know that that’s going to the right place and then we will address those as we go but let’s kick it off. So, this is me.  I am the founder of Next Step Test Preparation.  What we do is all one-on-one LSAT...

LSAT Webinar — Part 3

This is Part 3 of our LSAT Webinar, going over how to start preparing for the LSAT. Here’s LSAT Webinar Part 1 if you missed it. Here’s Part 4 of the LSAT webinar.  Next Step Test Preparation provides complete courses of one-on-one LSAT tutoring for about the price of a crowded lecture-style prep course. Email us or call 888-530-NEXT (6398) for a complimentary...

LSAT Webinar — Part 2

This is Part 2 of our LSAT Webinar, going over the most frequently asked questions for students considering the LSAT and law school. Here’s LSAT Webinar Part 1 if you missed it. Here’s Part 3 of the LSAT webinar.  Next Step Test Preparation provides complete courses of one-on-one LSAT tutoring for about the price of a crowded lecture-style prep course. Email us or call 888-530-NEXT (6398) for a complimentary consultation....