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June LSAT score release dates should be just around the corner. Many students will be quite happy with the scores they got back; if so, congratulations! If you’re mulling over a retake, here are some ideas to help with the decision.

You definitely should retake if:

  • Your test day score was more than three points below the average of your last 3 Preptests, especially if you can identify something specific that went wrong on the day of the test (nerves, illness, etc)

You should consider retaking if:

  • There were serious deficiencies in your preparation which might include:
    • less than two months of serious preparation
    • spotty prep schedule or rampant procrastination
  • Your score is below the 25% mark for admission at any of the law schools you’d like to go to and you have a reasonable reason to assume that you can do better on the next exam

You probably shouldn’t retake if:

  • Your score was in the 3-point range of your past Preptests but you “think you could do better”

This is a hard decision for a lot of test-takers.  In short, you want to have a reason to re-take. A  vague sense that you’re a 170+ scorer despite never having broken 165 would not be a good reason.

Another note: if you are planning on retaking, you need to think of another method to prepare.  The biggest example of this is people who took a Big Prep class, failed to improve much, and are mulling taking the course again (often for free). This is like having a used car break down then immediately buying a new one from the same dealership; you need to make a change.

Whether it’s upgrading from LSAT for Dummies to Powerscore Bibles, getting independent tutoring, or just increasing your focus, make sure you’re doing something different to prep this time.

Next Step Test Preparation provides complete courses of one-on-one tutoring with an LSAT expert for less than the price of a commercial prep course. Email us or call 888-530-NEXT (6398) for a complimentary consultation.

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